PMEC researchers are most active in six primary areas: Marine Energy Resource Characterization; Wave Energy Conversion Technology; Current Energy & Turbine Technology; Marine Operations; Environmental Effects; and Society & Policy.


Marine Energy Resource Characterization

Understanding marine energy resources is fundamental to their utilization. PMEC research has expanded our understanding of waves and currents, particularly the extremes that impose the highest structural loads on conversion technologies.

Deploying a Sea Spider instrumentation package to characterize tidal currents in Admiralty Inlet, WA.

Deploying a Sea Spider instrumentation package to characterize tidal currents in Admiralty Inlet, WA.


Wave energy Conversion Technology

Wave energy is the least utilized form of renewable energy and a challenging systems engineering problem that encompasses hydromechanics, control, and advanced mathematics. Research at PMEC seeks to develop more cost-effective approaches to harnessing this resource through simulation, laboratory experiments, and field trials.


Current Energy & Turbine Technology

The technology to convert tidal, river, and ocean currents to electricity has heavily leveraged advances in wind energy, but significant challenges remain. PMEC research has led to breakthroughs in the performance of individual turbines and dense arrays.


Marine operations

Anyone who has spent time at sea understands the difficulty of working in the marine environment. PMEC researchers are working to develop new marine energy use cases and approaches to installation, operations, and maintenance that leverage advances in machine learning, analytics, robotics, autonomy and other emerging technologies.


Environmental Effects

PMEC researchers are developing leading-edge methods and technologies to reduce uncertainty about the environmental effects of marine energy technologies. These can help to rapidly and cost-effectively identify risks that require mitigation and "retire" those that do not, assisting regulators in making evidence-based decisions regarding the potential impacts of marine energy projects.


Society & Policy

Without social acceptance, proving technical feasibility and environmental compatibility cannot enable broad adoption of marine energy conversion systems. PMEC research seeks to understand and quantify the many human dimensions of marine energy.

PMEC student Molly Grear presents a poster at Waterpower Week in Washington, DC.

PMEC student Molly Grear presents a poster at Waterpower Week in Washington, DC.

Want to collaborate with PMEC on a research project? Contact us at research@pmec.us.

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